HIBISCUS BENEFITS FOR RADIANT SKIN

As well as harnessing this incredible plant power on the inside, your skin can also take advantage of the numerous Hibiscus benefits.

THE 'BOTOX' PLANT

One of the most powerful anti-ageing plant actives; it’s no wonder Hibiscus is called the ‘Botox' plant. Hibiscus has a magical reputation for increasing skin elasticity to give a stunning natural youth-boost. With the incredible ability to inhibit the activity of the enzyme elastase, which is responsible for breaking down our skin’s precious elastin, Hibiscus actively combats the ageing process by firming and lifting your skin.

benefits to the skin

Hibiscus has a sort of magical reputation in skin care because it is a natural source of alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs). Chemical forms of these acids can be overly harsh and damaging to the skin, but natural sources such as those in hibiscus can help provide the same benefits without the harsh drawbacks. AHAs are known to help exfoliate, control oily skin and clogged pores, all of which can encourage fresher, younger, and smoother looking skin. They also increase moisture and firm your skin's look.

On top of the AHA activity are the antioxidants, which are called “anthocyanocides.” These not only protect the skin from environmental stressors, but have properties that help pores to appear smaller. They also can help with sensitive skin.

Finally, the plant has a high mucilage content, which makes it a great skin moisturizer. Combine all these properties together and you have a wonderful anti-aging ingredient that with regular use, helps skin to appear more supple and flawless overall. Plus it has a lovely, natural scent.

With powerhouse ingredients like this one, why would you ever want to use harsh chemicals?

a little bit about the ingredient itself

Hibiscus is a genus of flowering plants in the mallow family, with several hundred species native to warm, tropical regions. Also called “rosemallow,” hibiscus can be grown indoors or out. Flowers are large and trumpet shaped, with five or more petals. Colors include white, pink, red, orange, purple, or yellow. The extract is most often taken from the red flowers, also known as “roselle.”

Many cultures enjoy hibiscus tea, made from the flowers and served both hot and cold. In addition to Egypt, West Africa, Mexico, India, and Brazil enjoy the tangy flavor of hibiscus tea, which is also a favorite in Jamaica and other Caribbean islands.

Dried hibiscus is edible, and may be used in salads, as a vegetable or flavoring, or as a delicacy. Certain species are also used as a natural source of food coloring.